Wildlife Acoustics Bloggers

Nicole Wright

Birding with Technology: Q&A with David Sibley

Birding with Technology: Q&A with David Sibley

Ornithologist David Allen Sibley, author and illustrator of The Sibley Guide to Birds and illustrator for our Song Sleuth app, is widely considered to be one of the foremost authorities on North American birds.

While he collaborated with us, providing the beautiful artwork featured in our app, we decided to ask him about what he thought of technical birding tools, the future of birding, and whether or not he thinks he could outperform Song Sleuth (of course he can). 

Q: As a kid, what was the most meaningful piece of gear for you as a birder?

David Sibley: The most meaningful, for me, was my sketchbook. Sketching is how i really engage with birds. Just going out searching and watching is rewarding and fun, but my most memorable and satisfying experiences involve drawing.

'Batgirl' Thrilled to Receive new Wildlife Acoustics Research Tools

'Batgirl' Thrilled to Receive new Wildlife Acoustics Research Tools

Though she's still in high school, Alexis "Batgirl" Valentine is already an award-winning bat researcher. In fact, the precocious and passionate teen has been studying bats since the third grade. When she isn't in the field or in school, she is out educating her peers and other scientists about the importance of bats and the threats that they are facing. 

We were very fortunate to meet Alexis at NASBR (annual North American Society of Bat Researchers conference) recently, where she was invited to speak. Merlin Tuttle introduced the prodigious young scientist to us and explained that one of her goals was to one day purchase our recording equipment for her work on bats in The Great Smoky Mountain National Park. 

Our CEO and Founder Ian Agranat was so impressed and inspired by Alexis that he pledged to gift her with her very own Wildlife Acoustics equipment for her work. We loved seeing the look on her face from the photos her mom sent us when she opened her shipment of Wildlife Acoustics gear!  

Your Help is Needed to Record the Eclipse!

Your Help is Needed to Record the Eclipse!

The Project

Purdue University researchers are collaborating with science museums, zoos, and state and national park scientists as well as citizen scientists around the country to understand how Monday’s total solar eclipse will affect animal vocalizations and habits. They're looking for people like you to help with the data collection.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil