Wildlife Acoustics | Bioacoustic monitoring systems for research, science, industry and governments.

In the Field: Bat Conservation and Education in Rwanda

In the Field: Bat Conservation and Education in Rwanda

We love hearing about how our tools are being used around the world and we know that you do too. I recently asked Winifred Frick, Director of Conservation Science at Bat Conservation International to update us on their use of the Song Meter SM4BAT and Echo Meter Touch in Africa. Below is what she had to say about the beginnings of their recent effort in Rwanda: 

Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

We love hearing about how our customers are using our products and software, and we recently received feedback that you do too!

In the Field: Mounting an SM4BAT mic using a telescoping feeder arm.

In the Field: Mounting an SM4BAT mic using a telescoping feeder arm.

The growing demand for conducting passive acoustic monitoring of bats allowed me, a self-employed bat specialist, to purchase five SM4BAT FS recorders. The choice of passive recorders and analysis software today was somewhat overwhelming, but because the SM4BAT recorders are fully weatherproof, have a decent deployment time, an option to be cable lock secured to a tree and of course the three year warranty length, the decision to choose SM4BAT recorders was a swift one.

Listening for Signs of Life: A case study on using acoustic monitoring to assess remote seabird populations

Biologist Luke Halpin
Biologist Luke Halpin:

“My research takes place in Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida. Heritage Site in Haida Gwaii, an island archipelago off the west coast of British Columbia, 80km west of Prince Rupert. Haida Gwaii is home to 1.5 million breeding seabirds, including 50% of the global Ancient Murrelet population and large nesting populations of several other seabird species. Haida Gwaii is the only breeding location for Ancient Murrelets in Canada.

SM2+ in the classroom: MARA Project

SM2+ in the classroom: MARA Project

In Maryland, a group of 1300 amateur scientists have teamed up to document species of amphibians and reptiles by using high tech acoustic monitoring devices and mapping technology. They’re the seventh graders of Calvert County School System and they’re an integral part of the Maryland Amphibian and Reptile Atlas.