Wildlife Acoustics | Bioacoustic monitoring systems for research, science, industry and governments.

Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

We love hearing about how our customers are using our products and software, and we recently received feedback that you do too!

In New York, bat detecting is a walk in the park

In New York, bat detecting is a walk in the park

This past summer was a busy one for New York’s Central Park as always, but not just while the sun was out. This year, it was also the site of several very popular nighttime bat walks. In fact, they were so popular that they were sold out!

Hosted by the American Natural History Museum and led by New York City Bat Group volunteers, participants of all ages would gather up around dusk, hold up ultrasonic bat detectors, and hear bats all around them, many of them for the first time. With the help of these ultrasonic bat detectors, including the Echo Meter Touch, participants could not only hear bats which are typically inaudible, but they were also able to see the diversity of species living in the city--something that is not obvious to those that only visit the park during the day. The evenings started near balcony bridge but they ended with a whole new appreciation of the the nocturnal wildlife that occupy New York City at night.

STEM tips and resources for girls

STEM tips and resources for girls

One of the great things about how easy it is to use the Echo Meter Touch is that it allows kids to learn about bats, acoustics, and citizen science. In fact, we set up a list of links for students to get Echo Meter Touch for their classroom at our STEM resources page.

Echo Meter Touch facilitates the UK's First Deaf-Led bat walk

Echo Meter Touch facilitates the UK's First Deaf-Led bat walk

On July 17th, 2016, the Echo Meter Touch was a part of history on the UK’s first deaf-led bat walk. The bat walk was the idea of Alisdair Grant, Deaf Alumni Program Manager at Deaf Unity. Grant had been working towards his bat license and wanted to get the deaf community involved in his passion for bats. Together with the Heritage Ability Project (created by Living Options Devon to make heritage sites more accessible) they planned to build the bat walk into a free Open Day event at Cockington Country Park.