Wildlife Acoustics Blog

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Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

Customer Stories: Here's where to find them

We love hearing about how our customers are using our products and software, and we recently received feedback that you do too!

While we work on gathering more case studies and stories from the field, we wanted to make sure that you can find some right away. 

Here are several ways that you can read up on customer experiences: 

Announcing the Winners of the Q4 2015 Product Grant

Announcing the Winners of the Q4 2015 Product Grant

Once again, we are proud to announce that we were able to accommodate two grant winners this quarter. We received 90 applications from 10 countries and 6 continents submitted in just 8 weeks! The strength of these applicants’ proposals made it a very difficult decision for the grant committee, which is made up of Wildlife Acoustics staff.

We are pleased to award our Q4 2015 product grants to Dr Jessica Bryant from the Zoological Society of London and Dr Bryan Bedrosian of Teton Raptor Center.

Dr. Jessica Bryant, the Zoological Society of London

Detecting the world’s rarest ape: Improving monitoring efforts for the Hainan gibbon.

Customer Spotlight: Echo Meter Touch bicycle transects

Customer Spotlight: Echo Meter Touch bicycle transects

Can the Echo Meter Touch be used for bicycle transects?

For our resourceful customer Peder Halverson, the answer is yes.

Wondering know how he did it? Peder shared the details with us:

"It’s simply a camera monopod fastened to the bike’s front wheel frame, a wooden platform fastened to that, a cardboard iPad mini case box glued to that, the iPad mini in the carboard secured by a Velcro band. The module’s microphone is covered by a windscreen salvaged from a Zoom H2 recorder that was once used to record bat calls from a Petterson unit. The monopod pole can telescope up farther, but I like it this way for better visibility of the road ahead. The iPad can rotate on the monopod either this way, giving better visibility ahead, or it can rotate so that the screen is always visible to the rider. It likes to ride this way, slowly rotating to this orientation.

This method is being compared with the method in which the iPad is slipped into the rope pocket on the back of a backpack. So far the two methods seem to give equally good spectrograms, even though one might imagine the pole method to give less audio reflections. The backpack method allows the iPad’s cover to remain open, so that the screen is visible to automobiles to the rear, acting as a great additional reflector. It also feels a lot more secure for the iPad and module.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil