Wildlife Acoustics Blog

Dolphins

It’s a two way conversation at the Dolphin Communication Project!

It’s a two way conversation at the Dolphin Communication Project!

When you’re working with animals as precocious as dolphins, the lines can sometimes be blurred as to who is observing whom!

Dr. Kathleen Dudzinski experienced this recently as she was attaching her Wildlife Acoustics SM2M+ marine recorder to a piling to record dolphin sounds. As you can see in the photos and video we posted, she was quickly greeted by delphinid visitors who were very curious about the bright new yellow object being installed!

Many of these dolphins are not strangers to Dr. Dudzinski, however. She’s been visiting and studying them at Roatan Institute for Marine Sciences (RIMS) in Honduras since 2003.

Dolphins respond to their names when called

Dolphins respond to their names when called

About a year ago, scientists found that dolphins in captivity seemed to have ”signature whistles” or names for each other. According to the previous study, dolphins would use a specific whistle to refer to other dolphins. However, a new finding published at the end of July takes it a step further.

Scientists in St Andrews Bay off the coast of Scotland studied the behavior in a group of bottle nosed dolphins. They played the dolphins their own whistle “names” as well as the names of dolphins in their social group and dolphins of unrelated social groups. The actual whistle calls were tuned slightly to mimic a different “voice”. This removed the possibility that the dolphins were merely recognized the call of a familiar dolphin. When the dolphins heard their own name, they whistled it back in recognition and swam towards the sound. When they heard the whistle names of familiar dolphins, they showed a slight response indicative of recognition, and when they heard the names of dolphins they didn’t recognize, they showed no response.

This proves yet again, that we know relatively little about these intelligent creatures. The signature whistles only account for about half of dolphin whistle sounds, leaving plenty of room for research into the possible meaning of other dolphin vocalizations. We are excited to see what scientists find next!

Wildlife Acoustics on the cover of International Ocean Systems magazine!

Wildlife Acoustics on the cover of International Ocean Systems magazine!

We are proud to announce that we are being featured in the latest issue of International Ocean Systems magazine.

The piece highlights the hallmarks of our revolutionary SM2M Submersible and SM2+ bioacoustics recording systems.

The SM2M+ Submersible recorder is cleverly designed in that the device can monitor the sounds of multiple species clicks, songs and/or echolocations at once; from infrasonic to ultrasonic as well as up to extreme sound pressure levels.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil