Wildlife Acoustics Blog

Endangered Species

Eight new critically endangered frog species discovered

Eight new critically endangered frog species discovered

A record eight new species were discovered in a wilderness sanctuary in Sri Lanka. The country is known for its amphibian diversity, but it is unprecedented to find so many new species in just one park.

One such species, the Starry Shrub Frog, is considered rediscovered, since it was last seen 160 years ago and was thought to be extinct. Unfortunately the Starry Shrub Frog, as well as most of the other new species found, is already being considered critically endangered. In fact, it is estimated that one-third of amphibians are threatened. Contributing factors include habitat loss, pollution, and a deadly fungus. Despite the fact that 130 amphibians have gone extinct since 1980, scientists think we have yet to discover many new species in rich habitats such as those in Sri Lanka.

Photo by: L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe

How anyone can help save the birds!

How anyone can help save the birds!

Scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have noticed a decline in certain species of birds over the past three decades, although an exact cause is unknown. To help better understand what might be causing the downward trend, they are inviting the public to participate in “nest watching”. Anyone can go on the website and begin tracking data on nests that they spot. By recording information on how many eggs are laid, how many hatch, and how many survive, the scientists will get a better idea of what is happening to birds around the country. So what are you waiting for? Grab a notebook and binoculars and start saving the birds!

How airplanes are saving the whales

How airplanes are saving the whales

Since 1999, California has been protecting its marine life by providing underwater sanctuaries to preserve and reestablish increasingly threatened marine life. The network of sanctuaries is one of the world's largest and stretches all along the California coast. Everything in the protected areas is regulated; from recreation to research.

Lighthawk volunteer pilots fly airplanes above the waters, conducting aerial surveys of the habitats. Twice a month, the pilots follow whales and dolphins and monitor boat traffic. By collecting data on the geographic locations of the creatures, they are able to advise ships to change course and avoid collisions. They can then report their data to California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife and help them establish the whales’ geographic distribution. The same observers are getting the bigger picture on the kelp reforestation in the area. Their work has become a vital element in the restoration of the marine ecosystem in the Pacific Ocean, from its gigantic mammals to its plants.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil