Wildlife Acoustics Blog

Environment

In the Field: Song Meters allow researchers to better sample bird species in the tropics

In the Field: Song Meters allow researchers to better sample bird species in the tropics

We are always pleased to hear that our products are making life easier for scientists. That’s what one group from Charles University in Prague found when they published a study comparing conventional bird sampling using our  Song Scape feature from our Song Scope feature. The research noted that the autonomous capability of the Song Meters was highly useful in studying birds in remote areas of the tropics.

Traditionally, there are many limitations to doing such a study in the conventional way. First, there are few experts who are available in the area. Second, samples must be taken throughout the year to get the whole picture. Finally, extra care must be taken to avoid confusing or missing species in the field sampling because the area's species-rich environment.

In the end, the researchers found the Song Meters and Song Scope software an easy to-use and very efficient solution for sampling of several bird species. For more information, take a look at the poster.

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In this instalment of In the Field, we’re taking a peek at the research of Patrick Kleeman and Gary Fellers of the US Geological Survey.

WHERE: Primarily in Pt. Reyes and Yosemite National Park

WHY: They are looking for possible causes of the decline of amphibian populations in Northern California. The study is intended to be a long-term look at how breeding periods may change over time, possibly due to changes in climate.

Whales might be protecting their ears

Whales might be protecting their ears

Humans may be working on reducing underwater noise for whales and other marine life, but it looks like whales are already taking matters into their own hands…or fins.

It’s clear that the level of noise in the ocean has increased with industrialization. Today, sea creatures have to contend with the racket from sonar, boat engines, oil rigs, and more. In fact, it is estimated that just the noise from underwater Navy testing alone is leading to temporary or permanent hearing loss of at least a quarter of a million underwater critters every year.

The physiological effects of extremely loud noise on whales is evident deafness, tissue damage, and mass strandings.

Whales seem to be adapting to this acoustical assault. Using special suction cup electrodes connected to whales and dolphins in captivity, Dr. Nachtigall of the Marine Mammal Research Program was able to measure and study hearing sensitivity. He played a gentle warning tone to one whale in particular, Kina, and then followed it with a louder tone repeatedly and noticed Kina’s ability to reduce her hearing sensitivity when she anticipated a loud noise.

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Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil