Wildlife Acoustics Blog

Frogs

From The Technician's Desk

From The Technician's Desk

Imagine if you will, a field biologist’s worst nightmare.

You’ve taken care to set up your SM2+ units, deployed them in the field, checked to make sure your units have all powered up, and then set them to sleep. You trek back out of the back country to the access road you fought mud, rain, and blind corners to navigate. You go home, set aside your soaked clothes, pour a cup of your hot beverage of choice, and sit confident knowing your trusty SM2+ recorders will gather all the data you need for that big project.

A month later, you range out to the same patch of woods, unearth your recorders from the fallen pine needles, brush it off, and take the SD cards that hold your precious data back to base. Upon opening your recordings in Song Scope, you find to your deepest horror that nothing was recorded. Your heart sinks as you begin to understand the full consequences to the loss of data. The world spins as a Lovecraftian level of terror creeps in…

Eight new critically endangered frog species discovered

Eight new critically endangered frog species discovered

A record eight new species were discovered in a wilderness sanctuary in Sri Lanka. The country is known for its amphibian diversity, but it is unprecedented to find so many new species in just one park.

One such species, the Starry Shrub Frog, is considered rediscovered, since it was last seen 160 years ago and was thought to be extinct. Unfortunately the Starry Shrub Frog, as well as most of the other new species found, is already being considered critically endangered. In fact, it is estimated that one-third of amphibians are threatened. Contributing factors include habitat loss, pollution, and a deadly fungus. Despite the fact that 130 amphibians have gone extinct since 1980, scientists think we have yet to discover many new species in rich habitats such as those in Sri Lanka.

Photo by: L.J. Mendis Wickramasinghe

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In this instalment of In the Field, we’re taking a peek at the research of Patrick Kleeman and Gary Fellers of the US Geological Survey.

WHERE: Primarily in Pt. Reyes and Yosemite National Park

WHY: They are looking for possible causes of the decline of amphibian populations in Northern California. The study is intended to be a long-term look at how breeding periods may change over time, possibly due to changes in climate.

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Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil