Wildlife Acoustics Blog

in the field

Reminders for the Nov 15th Grant Deadline

With our second Scientific Product Grant deadline fast approaching, we’d like to remind applicants of some important guidelines to ensure that your application goes as far through the process as possible.

If you are applying by the Nov 15th, 2015 deadline, please keep in mind:

  • You will need to complete an updated application form, found here. The previous form used in the last application cycle is no longer valid.
  • The SM4 and SM4BAT are not available in this grant cycle as the grant will be awarded by the end of December.
  • Please ensure that you have included the documentation requested and have read the instructions carefully.

After determining if the applications fit our requirements and have provided the requested information, we will look for the best projects that make significant use of bioacoustics, advance scientific knowledge, and contribute to long-term conservation.

Our First Scientific Product Grant Results

Our First Scientific Product Grant Results

We were blown away by the volume and quality of the grant applications that we received in this past quarter for our first Wildlife Acoustics Product Grant application cycle. We received over 80 applications from all over the world. There were projects about koalas, penguins, and even crocodiles!

A handful of WA staff volunteered our time to diligently read the applications and make the tough decision of which to choose. In the end, we were happy to be able to provide Wildlife Acoustics gear to two projects this quarter.

Mark Danaher, Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge:

Project: Investigation of Eumops floridanus on the Florida Panther Wildlife Refuge

Customer Spotlight: Echo Meter Touch bicycle transects

Customer Spotlight: Echo Meter Touch bicycle transects

Can the Echo Meter Touch be used for bicycle transects?

For our resourceful customer Peder Halverson, the answer is yes.

Wondering know how he did it? Peder shared the details with us:

"It’s simply a camera monopod fastened to the bike’s front wheel frame, a wooden platform fastened to that, a cardboard iPad mini case box glued to that, the iPad mini in the carboard secured by a Velcro band. The module’s microphone is covered by a windscreen salvaged from a Zoom H2 recorder that was once used to record bat calls from a Petterson unit. The monopod pole can telescope up farther, but I like it this way for better visibility of the road ahead. The iPad can rotate on the monopod either this way, giving better visibility ahead, or it can rotate so that the screen is always visible to the rider. It likes to ride this way, slowly rotating to this orientation.

This method is being compared with the method in which the iPad is slipped into the rope pocket on the back of a backpack. So far the two methods seem to give equally good spectrograms, even though one might imagine the pole method to give less audio reflections. The backpack method allows the iPad’s cover to remain open, so that the screen is visible to automobiles to the rear, acting as a great additional reflector. It also feels a lot more secure for the iPad and module.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Orginization for Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil