Wildlife Acoustics Blog

products

Meet Song Scope, Our 3-in-1 Spectrogram Analysis Tool - Part 3: Creating a massive Song Scape with Song Scope

Meet Song Scope, Our 3-in-1 Spectrogram Analysis Tool - Part 3: Creating a massive Song Scape with Song Scope

Song Scope is our spectrogram tool, designed to review recordings made by Song Meter SM2+, SM2+ Aquatic, SM2M+ Deep Water, Submersible or other conventional bioacoustics recording equipment.

Song Scope is fast, intuitive, and very flexible. It’s really three tools in one. That’s why we’ve created a three-part blog series to show you what Song Scope can do!

In Parts 1 and 2 we told you that Song Scope is a easy to use Spectrogram Viewer and sophisticated Recognizer builder.

Meet Song Scope, Our 3-in-1 Spectrogram Analysis Tool - Part 2: Building Song Scope Recognizers for even faster analysis

Meet Song Scope, Our 3-in-1 Spectrogram Analysis Tool - Part 2: Building Song Scope Recognizers for even faster analysis

Song Scope is our spectrogram tool, designed to review recordings made by Song Meter SM2+, SM2+ Aquatic, SM2M+ Deep Water, Submersible or other conventional bioacoustics recording equipment.

Song Scope is fast, intuitive, and very flexible. It’s really three tools in one. That’s why we’ve created a three-part blog series to show you what Song Scope can do!

In Part 2 of our three-part series, we’re going to delve into what makes this tool truly unique.

Purdue HEMA lab pioneers field of Soundscape Ecology

Purdue HEMA lab pioneers field of Soundscape Ecology

Brian Pijanowski, Professor at Purdue University in Landscape Ecology, is pioneering the emerging field of Soundscape Ecology, and he's using Wildlife Acoustics SM2 Song Meters to do so. According to Pijanowski, sounds can oftentimes be the first indicators in a host of changes facing a habitat.

Like an acoustic fingerprint, each environment has its very own sonic signature, and that signature is bound to change with changes in its diversity. Using these aural snapshots, scientists are able to see what's happening in a landscape over time. At first glance, it might seem obvious to track the sounds in an environment as a gauge of biodiversity and ecological impact.

“Over increasingly large areas of the United States, Spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are strangely silent where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song.”
       – Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Orginization for Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil