Wildlife Acoustics Blog

UPS

Wildlife Acoustics goes carbon neutral with UPS & less packaging for the SM2+

Wildlife Acoustics goes carbon neutral with UPS & less packaging for the SM2+

We are proud to announce that we are now using the UPS Carbon Neutral shipping option as part of our efforts to reduce our company’s carbon footprint. As part of this initiative, we’ll pay a small fee per package that will go towards projects around the world like Garcia River Forest in the United States, Fujian Landfill Gas in China, La Pradera Landfill Gas in Colombia, and CholburiWastewater Biogas-to-Energy in Thailand. Offsetting our carbon footprint is a worth the extra cost and fits with our mission to be better stewards of the planet.

That’s not all we’re doing. We’ve also recently redesigned the Song Meter SM2+ packaging, which has resulted in a 25% reduction in box volume. In addition, the new box will replace the bubble wrap that we had previously sent the SM2 in. This will help reduce our non-recyclable packaging, as well as provide a way for customers to store their recorders.

Our very own Aubrey Garrett best explains why making these changes are important to us:

Super Mega Pod of Dolphins spotted off San Diego Coast!

Super Mega Pod of Dolphins spotted off San Diego Coast!

A pod of dolphins is a group of up to a dozen dolphins swimming together. A super pod is a much larger group, sometimes over a thousand dolphins. And a super mega-pod, well, that sounds like an escape vehicle from a 70s sci-fi movie. Actually, it was estimated that the enormous aggregation, which was spotted 7 miles from the coast of San Diego, spanned well over 35 square miles and contained about 100,000 dolphins. Can you imagine the amount of underwater communication in that scenario? We wish we were there with our SM2M+ Submersible bioacoustics recorder to catch the chatter!

More details and a picture of the super mega-pod

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In the Field with US Geological Survey’s amphibian monitoring program: Songmeters and Hydrophones in action

In this instalment of In the Field, we’re taking a peek at the research of Patrick Kleeman and Gary Fellers of the US Geological Survey.

WHERE: Primarily in Pt. Reyes and Yosemite National Park

WHY: They are looking for possible causes of the decline of amphibian populations in Northern California. The study is intended to be a long-term look at how breeding periods may change over time, possibly due to changes in climate.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Orginization for Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust