Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

Mark Bowler, San Diego Zoo Global Institute of Conservation Research

September, 2017

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

A stranded canoe shows how far the water had dropped in the last month.

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots. Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

Low water levels meant we stingrays were a hazard for our team as they cut a path through the stream with chainsaws

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

We tested the range that we could pick up gunshots on the SM4 recorders.

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

The SM4 Audio Recorders are paired with camera traps...this means we know when some recorders are visited by noisy wildlife species, like these whi, and will be able to quickly find some sample recordings!

July brought us some logistical challenges! Colleague Diego had set up 20 SM4 audio recorders in the Maijuna-Kichwa Regional Conservation Area two months previously. He had been rained on copiously, and enjoyed fast-flowing, deep streams to access the forest. The recorders had spend six weeks listening for gunshots, and animals, recording 24 hours a day with 512GB SD cards and a large car battery each. So with some excitement, I went up the Sucusari River to collect those recorders and their paired camera traps. Unfortunately the water level dropped much earlier than expected, and the river dried to a trickle in some places. River sections that took Diego and the team an hour, now took half a day hauling the canoes and clearing logs with the chainsaw. It was clear that the top half of the stream was not even accessible. With great effort, and a LOT of hiking through a very try 'rainforest', we extracted half the recorders and camera traps. Half the recorders are still in the forest, and we have to wait another couple of months to bring them out. On the plus side, the car batteries were still fresh - the units used far less power than I expected. This means I'll get another months worth of data upriver until the cards fill up.

One of the main applications we have is to listen for gunshots in this attractive reserve, and I completed some important range tests while bringing in these first recorders. Conditions were perfect - low wind and no rain, and even before analysis, it is clear that the under these conditions the range is close to 2km... given that our sample points are typically about 2km apart in our camera trap and acoustic surveys - this means that we have almost complete coverage in perfect conditions. We will have more 'real word' tests when we combine our audio data with spatial hunting data from our GPS tracked hunters who are registering their hunts in a wider range of conditions.

I now have to repeat my expedition in October, to get the units we failed to retrieve before. Then we face the not insignificant task of analyzing about 8 weeks worth of data from 20 SM4+ recorders, all recording 24 hours per day. We plan to use Wildlife Acoustic's 'Kaleidoscope software to analyze maybe 25,000 hours of recordings, first for gunshots, but then for peccaries, woolly monkeys and a range of key species. Beyond that we will have a resource available with which could survey birds, amphibians or insects. But first, I'm looking forward to getting back out to the Sucusari to recover our recorders.

June, 2017

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots. Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots. Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

This month we completed the installation of 20 SM4 recorders at 2km intervals in a large array in the Maijuna Regional Conservation Area (MRCA), on the Rio Napo in the Peruvian Amazon. The recorders are in trees to keep them safe from curious people, and hopefully to maximize the range we get from the units. This was backbreaking work for field assistant Diego, who had to climb all the trees! The SM4s are connected to car batteries and we hope to have at least six weeks constant recording from each unit, in which we should be able to find recordings of a wide range on animals. We hope to find these with the help of Wildlife Acoustics Kaleidoscope software, but a camera trap close to each recorder will give us a clue as to where to find sample recordings of noisy animals like peccaries. The main reason for deploying the recorders, however, is to record gunshots in the area. the MRCA is an extractive reserve, so there is legal hunting by residents, managed by the community themselves, and informed by our research. We track much of this hunting with GPS trackers on the guns of hunters, and can pinpoint the location of kills. With this we can calibrate the range of our recorders under varying conditions through several weeks. We will also be able to detect hunting by unknown individuals who may be hunting in the area without permission, directly informing the community management of the area. We hope audio recorders will prove to be a highly efficient way of monitoring hunting that can be expanded through forests across the globe.

Wildlife Acoustics is proud to support wildlife conservation efforts

Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation Orginization for Bat Conservation Bat Conservation International Bat Conservation Trust Wildlife Habitat Counsil