Wildlife Acoustics | Bioacoustic monitoring systems for research, science, industry and governments.

Dr. Kate Carstens

Dr. Kate Carstens

Identifying critical forest patches used for nesting and roosting by the endangered Cape Parrot

Dr. Kate Carstens and the Wild Bird Trust’s Cape Parrot Project are using acoustics to identify critical forest habitat for Cape Parrots in South Africa. With only 1,250 mature individuals remaining in the wild, identifying forest patches for protection is essential to ensuring the long-term viability of the population.

SM4 recorders will be rotated among 17 patches of forest during the breeding season to detect territorial behavior and again during the non-breeding season to monitor feeding areas and the use of the forests by humans. Kaleidoscope’s clustering technology will be used to extract and group bird calls in the recordings. Clusters identified as Cape Parrot calls will then be associated with territoriality, flying, feeding and perching behaviors. Cluster analysis will also be used to locate and identify human use of the forests. Finally, statistical analysis will help identify the likelihood of a forest being used as a breeding or roosting site.

Results of the acoustic surveys will guide conservation efforts including the installation of artificial nest boxes and restoration of Cape Parrot habitat, along with developing and maintaining strategic partnerships to effectively carry out conservation action. Results will also help link conservation with economic benefits to the small, rural communities surrounding the Cape Parrot forest habitats.

Min Kai Tan

Min Kai Tan

Discovery of Ultrasonic Singing Katydids from Southeast Asia

Mr. M. K. Tan of the National University of Singapore is studying the ultrasonic songs of katydids using the Echo Meter Touch 2 Pro. Using these handheld devices, calls of katydids will be recorded in the morning and evening in laboratory conditions or at biological stations to avoid noise from other species (e.g. bats).

The recordings will be analyzed to capture many parameters including the peak and mean frequencies, pulse duration, pulse repetition rate and interval between calls. This information will then be matched with anatomical data of the individual to create predictive models of the acoustic parameters based on the stridulatory anatomy.

Results of this study will form the basis of a song database for katydids in Southeast Asia. This database will address current knowledge gaps and will be used to inform researchers and impact long-term conservation in urban environments.