Wildlife Acoustics | Bioacoustic monitoring systems for research, science, industry and governments.

Mark Bowler

Mark Bowler
San Diego Zoo Global Institute
of Conservation Research

Monitoring the hunting of large Amazonian mammals and birds using remote acoustic recorders to locate gunshots.

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Mark and his team will be deploying an array of Song Meter SM4 acoustic recorders to listen for shots fired by hunters in the Sucusari, Maijuna-Kichwa Regional Conservation Area (MRCA), Loreto, Peru. The recorders will monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of indigenous hunting, and also detect unauthorized and illegal hunting in the MRCA. The work will enable effective management and protection of hunted species, and help develop a cost effective monitoring method that can be deployed in the Amazon and other parts of the world.

Mark will be using Kaleidoscope Pro with its new acoustic Cluster Analysis feature to analyze the recordings, create anthropogenic soundscapes and determine the occupancy of selected mammals and birds.

Dr. Darren S Proppe

Dr. Darren S Proppe
Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI

Testing the ability of Kaleidoscope Pro software to detect and cluster sounds embedded within anthropogenic noise.

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Deploying Song Meter SM4 acoustic recorders and exercising the power of Kaleidoscope Pro 4.1's acoustic Cluster Analysis feature, Darren will explore the temporal variation in songbird vocal behavior, and investigate the ability to detect vocal patterns in anthropogenic-induced, noisy environments. Dr. Proppe will share the results of his study with other research biologists and wildlife managers to understand songbird acoustic patterns, and the capability to detect these patterns with passive acoustic recorders, when subjected to anthropogenic noise.

The results will also be used as part of an experimental dataset, using noise playback to assess the singing rates for 19 species of songbirds in the field.

Dr. Eric Baitchman, DVM, DACZM

Dr. Eric Baitchman, DVM, DACZM
Zoo New England
Franklin Park Zoo, Boston, MA

Franklin Park Zoo Biodiversity Project

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The topic of urban biodiversity and conservation has recently attracted interest among biologists and citizen scientists alike. With the help of community volunteers and school children, Zoo New England and Grassroots Wildlife Conservation, Inc, will spread out among the 65 acre "Wilderness" portion of Franklin Park with Echo Meter Touch bat detector|recorder|analyzer systems to explore the world of bats as part of a biodiversity survey project in the park.

Zoo New England staff will serve as ambassadors and stewards of the park fauna and will work with school children and citizen scientists to uncover biodiversity within their midst.

Data will be collected by visual observation and listening for animal vocalizations and recording them on suitable smart phone apps. In addition to identifying data, locations will be GPS tagged. The Echo Meter Touch allows Zoo staff to include the ecologically important taxa of bats, which they would not otherwise be able to survey, and is well suited to on-site bat work as volunteers can record, play back and see bat echolocation calls on a spectrogram on their iPhones, iPads or iPods.

Susan Wethington

Susan Wethington
Hummingbird Monitoring Network

Detecting how weather, plant phenology and abundance of available nectar influence hummingbird migration

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Hummingbirds face accelerated habitat loss and degradation because of extensive agriculture, urban sprawl and climate change. Given that they're pollinators, they depend almost entirely upon nectar for their energy supply, and their survival is affected by the reliable, year-round sources of nectar-producing plants.

Susan and her team of high school students will use Kaleidoscope Pro 4.1 software with acoustic Cluster Analysis to analyze field data captured during hummingbird migration, and create hummingbird classifiers. The study will investigate the following factors; whether flower plant and nectar abundance affects migration, if bird abundance is related to availability of nectar and patch size, and finally, do weather events affect migration.

Research results will be shared with Hummingbird Monitoring Network to further its work in the conservation of hummingbird diversity and abundance.

Amy K. Wray

Amy K. Wray
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Effects of White Nose Syndrome on bat activity, diet composition and insect abundance in Southern Wisconsin

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The arrival of White Nose Syndrome provides a unique circumstance to better understand the role of bats as biological control agents of agricultural pests. Amy and her team will be collecting bat echolocation call data from Song Meters deployed at 20 roost sites in southwestern Wisconsin. Using Kaleidoscope Pro analysis software, the data will be used to provide a better estimate of the regional and local pest control benefits brought by big brown and little brown bats.

The results will help to refine management strategies and promote bat conservation in Wisconsin as well as throughout the Midwest.